A cold morning at the garden

With our recent cold temperatures the plants needed some extra TLC.

(click images for slideshow)

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It’s beginning to look a lot like a garden

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Update and new photos

A little bunny, named Jim got into the garden and made a salad for his wife. 😉
Click the images for larger views and explanations.

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End of September 2011 photos and progress

We have 203 containers planted from 5 to 15 gallon size.  The 15 gallon containers average 4 plants per container and have thus far used 980 gallons of water.  The in ground garden has 132 plants and has thus far used 3800 gallons of water.  I have attached several photos, use anything you want at your own discretion.  We continue to gain more volunteers that just stop by out of curiosity and join in when they can thereby adding greatly to the learning/teaching value of our great experiment.  We have also enjoyed the added benefit of meeting some great neighbors in the community.  Click the images for larger views.


Compost Analysis

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Progress – more pictures

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Popularity of crop swaps is growing

From SFGate.com:

FOOD
Bay Area among U.S. leaders in crop swaps, as farmers barter over backyard bounties

September 04, 2011|Stacy Finz, Chronicle Staff Writer

  • Julie Brand holds a zucchini as her neighbors exchange vegetables at the San Anselmo Garden Exchange, which also has eggs.
    Julie Brand holds a zucchini as her neighbors exchange vegetables at the San Anselmo Garden Exchange, which also has eggs.
    Credit: Photos by Lance Iversen / The Chronicle

An American subculture is trying to fend off the apocalypse, one heirloom tomato at a time.

Crop swaps – meets where people trade their backyard bounty – are sprouting up all over the nation, but especially in the Bay Area.

The seeds were planted decades ago: I’ll trade you a few of my Meyer lemons for a couple of your golden zucchini. Then, with the advent of the grocery store, consumers were more likely to buy just what they needed. But in these times of economic crisis, bartering for food is making a comeback.

To read the entire article click here.